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news

Yummy 3.4.3

New shortcut menu
Yummy

Yummy 3.4.3 has just been approved by Apple and should be available for download from the App Store shortly (if it isn’t already).

It’s a pretty small update, one of those “bug fixes and minor update” releases. The main user-visible change is that it now supports all the latest Apple devices and their new screen sizes. It’s built with the latest Apple developer kit but doesn’t currently take advantage of any of the new iOS 14 features.

I have heard a few reports of Yummy’s Share Extension not appearing correctly on iOS 14. I think this is a problem with iOS since I’ve not changed anything in Yummy and it’s been working since 2015. Indeed, Yummy 3.4.2 is still built against iOS 13. I can’t guarantee that this version will miraculously fix it, but that’s my hope.

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news

Quick Calendar 1.3.1 (for iPhone, iPad and Watch)

Quick Calendar

Approved in super-quick time: the latest update for Quick Calendar. This version runs the same code as the Mac version and has the exact same features in the iOS14 widget.

That means, new in this version is the ability to pick the first day of the week. Previously it always picked the day your system’s locale suggested, and that’s still the default. But now you can change it.

This was basically the number one feature request. Embarrassingly it only didn’t make it into 1.3.0 because of a silly off-by-one error. Anyway, better late than never!

Hope you like it. You can download it from the App Store now.

Categories
support

Quick Calendar Interactivity

If you’re using Quick Calendar on a Mac and you’ve not yet upgraded to macOS 11 Big Sur, you might be aware that the “<“ and “>” buttons allow you to move from one month to the next.

Big Sur Quick Calendar Widget
Big Sur Quick Calendar Widget

I’ve had a couple of emails from people who have upgraded to Big Sur asking where those buttons have gone in the new widget and when they might be coming back.

So what can we do? Other than a couple of “long shot” ideas that I won’t discuss until I’ve done some testing, there one thing.

The simplest thing would be to add an “offset.” Currently, the Widget displays the current month plus the next two or four if there’s space. Instead of showing the current month first, it could show, say, last month. This will likely make it into the next version.

If you have any other ideas, please suggest them in the comments below. I can’t promise anything but I’m always happy to hear them.

Categories
support

Wandle Apps and macOS 11 Big Sur

If you upgraded to macOS 11 last week, hopefully, you also got the latest version of Quick Calendar which also includes a new Widget.

Something that you might have seen in Apple’s marketing literature is the ability to run iOS apps on the Mac. To be clear: this is not something that works on existing Mac, only on the brand-new-out-this-week Apple Silicon-based Macs. And the obvious question is, what about Wandle Software’s app? Can you run them on new Macs?

Big Sur Quick Calendar Widget
Big Sur Quick Calendar Widget

There are two answers to this. The first one is yes. I’ve allowed Yummy to be downloaded from the Mac App Store. I turned off the ability to download Quick Calendar since there’s already a Mac app.

But the second answer is: I don’t know. I don’t have an Apple Silicon Mac, so I’ve not tested it. It might work well, or it might not work at all. This also means that if you have problems, I can’t really help. If I hear about a lot of problems I’ll probably disable downloads until the point that I can adequately test it.

So, if you have a new M1 Mac, I hope you enjoy your new toy and I hope my apps work well on it! Please let me know your experiences in the comments below.

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news

Quick Calendar 1.3.1 (macOS)

If you’ve been following along to the earlier happenings in the world of Quick Calendar, this new version should not be a Big Sur-prise (sorry).

Earlier this year I migrated the Watch app from its old watchOS foundation to an entirely new SwiftUI base. I don’t normally talk much about the internals, but this time it’s important. I was able to use exactly the same code to build the widget for iOS and iPadOS 14. Again, I’ve been able to use exactly the same code to build a new widget for macOS 11.

There’s currently feature parity between the iOS and macOS versions of the widget (or will be when version 1.3.1 for iOS is released). So you get multiple sizes. You get the ability to change the “today” highlight colour. And you can change the week start day from your calendar default — this is probably the number one feature request.

What I’m talking about here is a completely new widget for macOS 11 (and above). You’ll need to update your Mac to the latest release to make use of this new widget. Quick Calendar still comes with the “old” widget, unchanged from the previous version.

The software is currently with Apple for review. I’m hoping that it will be available for download at the same time as Big Sur itself.

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news

Quick Calendar 1.3.0

Quick Calendar 1.3.0 is currently with Apple for review. You can think of this as the iOS 14, ipadOS 14 and watchOS 7 release.

Quick Calendar’s iOS 14 widget

If you saw the tweet, you’ll realise that this release didn’t entirely go to plan. The whole Apple developer community were wrong-footed by the new versions of the operating systems launching with less than a day’s notice. Fortunately, this release was almost ready.

The “original” notification centre widget is largely unchanged, but there is additionally a new one that’s supported only in Apple’s newest operating systems. It’s based on the same foundation as the Watch app that arrived in version 1.2.

You can place your widgets on the left side of your iPad screen, alongside your app icons or on the very left screen of your iPhone. Quick Calendar’s widget comes in three sizes: one month, two months and four months.

One of the most popular requests I’ve had since launch has been for the ability to change the “today” highlight colour. The new widget has this ability. If you press-and-hold the widget, it flips over to reveal the available options.

I’ve been using this widget myself for over a month now and I like it! I hope you do too. I should be available to download in the App Store shortly.

Categories
news

Yummy 3.4.2

The way that Yummy talks with Pinboard is using what’s called an API, an application programming interface. Pinboard’s API is based on the now-defunct Delicious bookmarking site, now also owned by Pinboard.

Why am I telling you all this? The funny thing is, the Pinboard API is not very good for syncing your whole collection of bookmarks with a third-party app. Of course, this is the whole raison d’être for Yummy.

Since 2008, Yummy has gone through a few iterations of its synchronisation code. In the very early days, it was limited by both the hardware and the software of the time. The slow, single-core CPU of early iPhones, plus the lack of memory, meant that some approaches just wouldn’t work reliably. Plus I had to make it sync with both Pinboard and Delicious.

Yummy 3.4.2 represents the latest update. It’s the fastest version yet and is more efficient, taking less of a toll on your battery life.

There are also a few bug fixes and minor improvements that most people won’t notice. I guess that’s the theme of this release!

It’s now with Apple for review and hopefully will be available to download very shortly.

Categories
news

Quick Calendar for Apple Watch 1.2.1

Quick Calendar 1.2 had a completely new Apple Watch app. Written in SwiftUI, it presents the future of the Watch app and the widgets on all other platforms. It looks better and is much cleaner and more future proof than the old version.

Custom highlight in Quick Calendar Watch app
Custom highlight in Quick Calendar Watch app

Sadly there was also a bug: it didn’t update to the “current” date, always highlighting the date it was first launched rather than today. Version 1.2.1 fixes that.

But that’s not all.

Since we’re talking about the “today” highlight, version 1.2.1 also gives you the ability to change the highlight colour. This is probably the most common feature request, so I’m happy to be able to include it now!

The update has just been submitted to Apple and should be available to download shortly.

Categories
news

Quick Calendar 1.2.0

This new version of Quick Calendar for iPhone, iPad and Watch can be thought of as a taste of the future. In practical terms that means:

  • Fix for the Watch complication
  • All New Watch App

Let’s start with the app. The new version looks better, has better visual affordances and offers a better foundation for the future.

watchOS Quick Calendar
watchOS Quick Calendar

The “look” isn’t purely about aesthetics. It makes better use of the very limited available space, and the highlighted date is much clearer. It always bothered me that there were no clues about how you could move between months. Both swiping and turning the crown worked but not everyone found them. Using a simple list, a familiar interface convention, fixes that1.

Finally, the foundation. It’s now written in SwiftUI, the latest Apple technology. The neat thing is that it’s possible to use the same code on all platforms, from the Watch all the way to the Mac. The goal here is feature parity for all versions.

The complication has bugged me (pun intended) for some time. In hindsight, I was probably overthinking it.

You can update complications basically in two ways: on a schedule or when something happens. The schedule seems like the obvious one: we know when the next day starts, right? But what happens when I step from a plane and into a new time zone? The date might be different. So rather than take the “easy” route, previous versions of Quick Calendar attempted to update the complication periodically. This works for a day or two but then watchOS says “you’ve used up all your time” and doesn’t run it again. In short: it took a week to test every change I made! And nothing helped.

Version 1.2.0 takes a different approach. It generates a timeline, allowing watchOS to update the complication without any further intervention. That pretty much always works. If you ever find yourself in a new time zone and with the complication showing the wrong date, you can force a refresh by opening the app. As I say, easy in hindsight.

Apple approved this very quickly, so it’s already available to download.


  1. A current limitation is that you can’t go back to a previous month. Long story short, this is a limitation of SwiftUI. I’m looking to see if there are workarounds. ↩︎
Categories
trivia

WWDC 2020

There’s a lot to take in. As ever, the keynote is a bit of a firehose and knowing where to start is a challenge. What looks cool? Will it work on my hardware? How will it affect Wandle Software’s apps? Ultimately, none of these questions will be answered in this post. This is just some quick thoughts and speculation and is, by no means, a commitment!

At a high level, things look pretty good. iOS and iPadOS don’t look super ambitious so, hopefully, they’ll be more stable than iOS 13 was las year. Sadly, that’s not a high bar to clear. There’s still some nice stuff. As I user, I think I’ll appreciate the new Siri interface and the on-device speech recognition. It’ll be fascinating to see how Translate works. The more desktop-class apps, like Music, on the iPad look great.

Looking at it from the point of view of someone with an existing Mac, Big Sur looks… fine. I’m not sure that more Catalyst apps is a good idea; last years just were not terribly good. The updated UI… again, I don’t have a strong visceral reaction one way or the other. I don’t think it would have been my first choice of new feature however.

Looking forward, it is, of course, the move to “Apple Silicon” CPUs in the Mac that is the big news. This has been rumoured so long that it felt like almost a relief when they announced it. As with previous transitions, they seem to have planned it well.

As a developer, I’m ambivalent about it. As long as the tools are available — and I suspect they will be — I’m not sure it matters what the underlying CPUs architecture is. If I write Scala or Swift or Ruby, the tools all do the conversion for me. If anything, as I quipped on Twitter, having ARM Macs will make my Raspberry Pi more useful as the number of suitable Docker images will vastly increase.

What about Wandle’s apps? It’s really too early to say. Widgets on both Mac, iOS and iPadOS look dramatically different so I suspect Quick Calendar will need some work. Yummy’s recently added Popular Links widget might also need a refresh.

Overall, cautiously positive about WWDC this year.